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dc.creatorDare, Timen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:08:43Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:08:43Zen
dc.date.created1998-04en
dc.date.issued1998-04en
dc.identifier10.1111/biot.1998.12.issue-2en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics. 1998 Apr; 12(2): 125-149.en
dc.identifier.issn0269-9702en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Mass+Immunisation+Programmes:+Some+Philosophical+Issues&title=Bioethics.++&volume=12&issue=2&pages=125-149&date=1998&au=Dare,+Timen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/biot.1998.12.issue-2en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/757137en
dc.description.abstractMost countries promote mass immunisation programmes. The varying policy details raise a raft of philosophical issues. I have two broad aims in this paper. First, I hope to begin to remedy a rather curious philosophical neglect of immunisation. With this in mind, I take a broad approach to the topic hoping to introduce rather than settle a range of philosophical issues. My second aim has two aspects: I argue that the states should have pro-immunisation policies, and I advance a view of the subsequent and more specific question as to which sorts of pro-immunisation policies they should prefer. I use the immunisation policies of the United States and New Zealand to frame my discussion of these substantive questions. Immunisation is effectively compulsory in the United States. New Zealand, by contrast, requires evidence not of immunisation but of immunisation status upon school enrolment: New Zealand's policy effectively makes immunisation choice compulsory. I argue that, as between the pro-immunisation policies of the United States and New Zealand, the latter should be preferred. Though the threshold question as to whether states should have pro-immunisation policies should be answered affirmatively, the move to compulsory immunisation cannot be justified.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:KIE/58624en
dc.subjectChildrenen
dc.subjectCoercionen
dc.subjectComparative Studiesen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectImmunizationen
dc.subjectInternational Aspectsen
dc.subjectMandatory Programsen
dc.subjectParentsen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectSchoolsen
dc.subjectTime Factorsen
dc.subjectUncertaintyen
dc.subjectUtilitarianismen
dc.subjectVoluntary Programsen
dc.titleMass Immunisation Programmes: Some Philosophical Issuesen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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