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dc.creatorCraig, Douglas B.en
dc.creatorWebster, George C.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:08:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:08:54Zen
dc.date.created1998-05en
dc.date.issued1998-05en
dc.identifier10.1007/BF03019216en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCanadian Journal of Anaesthesia. 1998 May; 45(5 Pt2 Suppl): R160-R165.en
dc.identifier.issn0832-610Xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Do+Not+Resuscitate+Orders+Managing+the+Dilemma&title=Canadian+Journal+of+Anaesthesia.++&volume=45&issue=5&pages=R160-R165&date=1998&au=Craig,+Douglas+B.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF03019216en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/757419en
dc.description.abstractThe status of DNR orders (or equivalent declarations) in patients undergoing surgery will continue to present considerable challenges for both healthcare providers and patients, or their alternate decision makers. It is essential that all parties understand the specifics of each DNR order, focusing not only on the actual content of the order or declaration but also on the context in terms of location, timing and circumstance. The principle of "respect for persons" should guide, inform and shape the approach followed with each patient. Meaningful dialogue and "negotiation" will be required. Make no assumptions! The "required reconsideration" of pre-existing DNR orders should be the basic approach followed. There is no single "solution" for all DNR-related issues in the peri-operative period. What may appear obvious to the anaesthetist may be viewed entirely differently by the patient, or even by other members of the care giving team. There is no justification for either the automatic suspension or the automatic continuation of DNR orders in patients undergoing surgery. A patient-specific and situation-specific approach and "solution" is required. Similar principles will apply in acute care settings other than the operating room. Full engagement by health care workers in the processes addressing these issues should be a personally enriching experience.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/98262419en
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAnesthesiaen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDirective Adherenceen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectDNR Ordersen
dc.subjectDo Not Resuscitate Ordersen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectGuidelinesen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectIatrogenic Diseaseen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectInstitutional Policiesen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectPatient Care Teamen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectProfessional Organizationsen
dc.subjectResuscitationen
dc.subjectResuscitation Ordersen
dc.subjectSelection for Treatmenten
dc.subjectSurgeryen
dc.subjectThird Party Consenten
dc.subjectUncertaintyen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subjectWithholding Treatmenten
dc.titleDo Not Resuscitate Orders -- Managing the Dilemmaen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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