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dc.creatorDe Ville, Kenneth A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:10:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:10:02Zen
dc.date.created1999-10en
dc.date.issued1999-10en
dc.identifier10.1076/jmep.24.5.492.2517en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1999 Oct; 24(5): 492-517.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-5310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Managed+Care+and+the+Ethics+of+Regulation&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy.++&volume=24&issue=5&pages=492-517&date=1999&au=De+Ville,+Kenneth+A.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1076/jmep.24.5.492.2517en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/758148en
dc.description.abstractThe dramatic appearance of managed care organizations (MCOs) on the U.S. health scene has generated tremendous anxiety among health care providers and patients. These fears are based on the belief that managed care techniques pose greater risks of under treatment than do fee-for-service modes of payment. In addition, many physicians and patients resent the limits placed on clinical autonomy by the MCO model and the stresses that it places on the traditional physician-patient relationship. These misgivings have been exacerbated by the mostly negative response to MCOs in the media and academia. Legislatures have responded to these claims and public fears with a wave of regulatory initiatives. Some of these regulations are attempts to protect patients. Others, however, are motivated primarily by antipathy toward the concept of managed care itself. This essay is an attempt to develop a social ethic of regulation and argues that the sole reason that private enterprise may be justifiably limited is when it presents a risk of harm to others or society. While some regulation and proposed regulation of MCOs meet this standard, much legislation represents an unjustified attempt to limit or handicap otherwise legal behavior merely because a segment of the population and medical profession find it aesthetically unpleasing and oppose its approach to the delivery of health services.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/20080396en
dc.subjectAccountabilityen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectChildbirthen
dc.subjectDisclosureen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFreedomen
dc.subjectGoalsen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHarmen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Deliveryen
dc.subjectHealth Insuranceen
dc.subjectHealth Servicesen
dc.subjectIncentivesen
dc.subjectIndustryen
dc.subjectInstitutional Ethicsen
dc.subjectInstitutional Policiesen
dc.subjectInsuranceen
dc.subjectLegal Aspectsen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMoral Obligationsen
dc.subjectManaged Careen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectPolitical Activityen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectState Governmenten
dc.subjectTortsen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleManaged Care and the Ethics of Regulationen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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