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dc.creatorEpstein, Richard A.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:10:02Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:10:02Zen
dc.date.created1999-10en
dc.date.issued1999-10en
dc.identifier10.1076/jmep.24.5.434.2516en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy. 1999 Oct; 24(5): 434-460.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-5310en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Managed+Care+under+Siege&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy.++&volume=24&issue=5&pages=434-460&date=1999&au=Epstein,+Richard+A.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1076/jmep.24.5.434.2516en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/758150en
dc.description.abstractManaged Care Organizations (MCOs) are frequently criticized for their marketing mistakes. Often that criticism is leveled against an implicit benchmark of an ideal competitive market or an ideal system of government provision. But any accurate assessment in the choice of health care organizations always requires a comparative measure of error rates. These are high in the provision of health care, given the inherent uncertainties in both the cost and effectiveness of treatment. But the continuous and rapid evolution of private health care mechanisms is, in the absence of regulation, more likely to secure access and contain costs than any system of government regulation. State regulation is subject to the risk of capture and to the sluggish and acquisitive behavior of state run monopolies. The proposed fixes for the MCOs (rights to specialists, access to physicians outside the network, guaranteed emergency room access) are likely, when imposed from without, to cost more than they are worth. The long-term risk is that markets will fail under regulation, paving the way for greater losses from massive government control of the health care delivery system.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/20080394en
dc.subjectContractsen
dc.subjectCosts and Benefitsen
dc.subjectEconomicsen
dc.subjectEvolutionen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectGovernment Financingen
dc.subjectGovernment Regulationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Deliveryen
dc.subjectHealth Insuranceen
dc.subjectInsuranceen
dc.subjectManaged Care Programsen
dc.subjectMarketingen
dc.subjectManaged Careen
dc.subjectOrganizationsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPolicy Analysisen
dc.subjectPoliticsen
dc.subjectPrivate Sectoren
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectPublic Sectoren
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectResource Allocationen
dc.subjectRightsen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.titleManaged Care Under Siegeen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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