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dc.creatorYawn, Barbara P.en
dc.creatorYawn, Roy A.en
dc.creatorGeier, G. Richarden
dc.creatorXia, Zhisenen
dc.creatorJacobsen, Steven J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:11:04Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:11:04Zen
dc.date.created1998-11en
dc.date.issued1998-11en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Family Practice. 1998 Nov; 47(5): 361-365.en
dc.identifier.issn0094-3509en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+Impact+of+Requiring+Patient+Authorization+for+Use+of+Data+In+medical+Records+Research&title=Journal+of+Family+Practice.++&volume=47&issue=5&pages=361-365&date=1998&au=Yawn,+Barbara+P.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/759235en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: In 1996, the Minnesota legislature passed a medical data privacy act requiring patient authorization for the use of medical records in research. Other state legislatures and Congress are considering similar legislation. The impact of this statute on a researcher's ability to obtain complete and representative data is unknown. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of all patients visiting the outpatient clinic, emergency department, or hospital of the Olmsted Medical Center (OMC), for an appointment or admission during January 1997 or February 1997. Patients were asked to give consent for the use of their medical records for research. Our objective was to gather information on the number and characteristics of patients who refused authorization. RESULTS: Of the 15,997 patients: 90.6% granted authorization; 3.6 refused authorization; 4.5% were undecided; and 1.3% were not asked for authorization. Refusal rates were highest among patients visiting the center for mental health concerns, trauma, or eye care, and among women aged 39 years or older. Undecided rates were highest in women presenting for pregnancy care. CONCLUSIONS: Refusal rates were low for this community practice. However, higher refusal rates in some subgroups, such as older women or patients with mental health concerns, may increase the chance of selection bias in studies involving these patients.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/99051836en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectComparative Studiesen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectEpidemiologyen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMedical Recordsen
dc.subjectMental Healthen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPrimary Health Careen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectRecordsen
dc.subjectRefusal to Participateen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectStatisticsen
dc.titleThe Impact of Requiring Patient Authorization for Use of Data in Medical Records Researchen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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