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dc.creatorSalonen, Kimen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:11:20Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:11:20Zen
dc.date.created1996-08en
dc.date.issued1996-08en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHealth Law in Canada. 1996 Aug; 17(1): 10-19.en
dc.identifier.issn0226-8841en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Directed+Blood+Donation:+a+Matter+of+Public+Trust&title=Health+Law+in+Canada.++&volume=17&issue=1&pages=10-19&date=1996&au=Salonen,+Kimen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/759678en
dc.description.abstractTrust is the key issue in blood treatment with respect to public policy. Public trust in the blood system in Canada continues to be exceedingly low. According to the February, 1996 Gallup poll conducted by Janssen-Ortho Inc., 89% of those surveyed chose alternatives to the Red Cross (volunteer) blood. Strategies directed at improving the safety of the blood system will fall short of this goal unless public knowledge and consumer participation are considered. Consumers need to participate in decision making for themselves with the physicians, as well as in the decision making process at the level of public policy. Consumer involvement would contribute to an overall plan of rebuilding public trust. Canadian health care consumers have been significantly affected by the blood tragedy of the 1980s. Public perception of blood safety has been characterized by misunderstanding and fear. The search for alternate methods of transfusion, such as directed donation, are based on a lack of trust of the current blood system. As introducing a program of directed blood donation would not increase safety or decrease the expense of blood transfusions, such a program should not be introduced in Ontario at this time.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:AHAKIE/97104455en
dc.subjectAlternativesen
dc.subjectBlooden
dc.subjectBlood Banksen
dc.subjectBlood Donationen
dc.subjectBlood Transfusionsen
dc.subjectConsumer Participationen
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectDirected Donationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHospitalsen
dc.subjectKnowledgeen
dc.subjectLegislationen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPublic Opinionen
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectSocial Impacten
dc.subjectTrusten
dc.titleDirected Blood Donation: A Matter of Public Trusten
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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