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dc.creatorSchaffner, Kenneth F.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:12:16Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:12:16Zen
dc.date.created2000-01en
dc.date.issued2000-01en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTheoretical Medicine and Bioethics. 2000 Jan; 21(1): 85-101.en
dc.identifier.issn1386-7415en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Medical+Informatics+and+the+Concept+of+Disease&title=Theoretical+Medicine+and+Bioethics.++&volume=21&issue=1&pages=85-101&date=2000&au=Schaffner,+Kenneth+F.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/760142en
dc.description.abstractThis paper attempts to address the general question whether information technologies, as applied in the area of medicine and health care, have or are likely to change fundamental concepts regarding disease and health. After a short excursion into the domain of medical informatics I provide a brief overview of some of the current theories of what a disease is from a more philosophical perspective, i.e. the "value free" and "value laden" view of disease. Next, I consider at some length, whether health care informatics is currently modifying fundamental concepts of disease. To this question I will answer largely in the negative, and I will provide the sketch of some arguments from current research programs in medical informatics why I think this is the case. This argumentation is supported by a detailed account of how the disease profile for beriberi heart disease, used in one of the major medical informatics diagnostic programs, QMR (and its ancestor INTERNIST-1), was developed, and why at least this program essentially follows received views of traditional medicine. The one main exception to the conformity of this program to "received" views of a disease occurs when the program's designers need to fine-tune a disease definition. This fine-tuning is to comport with the expert's perspective on the disease, including his or her epistemic values, as well as the program's other resources for diagnosing components of a disease.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/20383105en
dc.subjectBiomedical Technologiesen
dc.subjectClassificationen
dc.subjectDiagnosisen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectNormalityen
dc.subjectPhilosophyen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectSocial Impacten
dc.subjectTraditional Medicineen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.titleMedical Informatics and the Concept of Diseaseen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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