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dc.creatorMayer, Bettyen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-05T19:12:18Zen
dc.date.available2015-05-05T19:12:18Zen
dc.date.created1998en
dc.date.issued1998en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursingConnections. 1998 Winter; 11(4): 5-21.en
dc.identifier.issn0895-2809en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Dilemmas+in+Mandatory+Reporting+of+Domestic+Violence:+Carative+Ethics+in+Emergency+Rooms&title=NursingConnections.++&volume=11&issue=4&pages=5-21&date=1998&au=Mayer,+Bettyen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/760194en
dc.description.abstractLaws are clear when it comes to reporting child abuse, elder abuse, or maltreatment of the disabeled; however, the fuzzy area of domestic violence, or injury to women by their husbands or intimates, puzzles the system ethically and legally. Experts are divided on the issue of mandatory reporting of domestic violence by health care professionals. As exemplified by the Florida law, the crux of the problem may be twofold. First, the law requires reporting of certain incidents that are ambiguously defined. Second, reporting may be mandatory without the patient's consent. Many experts in the field of domestic violence suggest that mandated reporting by health care workers is not in the best interests of the victims; it may lead to more violence and increase the victim's reluctance to get needed health care. This victim vulnerability creates ethical dilemmas in the emergency department, often the first outside contact after a violent incident. This paper examines the implications of reporting applied to emergency practice in the context of basic ethical standards. The application of mandatory reporting laws to competent adult victims presents questions related to nonmaleficence, beneficence, autonomy, confidentiality, and a variety of contextual issues that arise from these main ethical domains.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceBRL:MEDKIE/99212753en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectChild Abuseen
dc.subjectConfidentialityen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectDomestic Violenceen
dc.subjectDiscriminationen
dc.subjectEmergency Careen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFemalesen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectGovernment Regulationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Personnelen
dc.subjectJusticeen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLawsen
dc.subjectMandatory Reportingen
dc.subjectNonmaleficenceen
dc.subjectPaternalismen
dc.subjectPatient Advocacyen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectRegulationen
dc.subjectRisks and Benefitsen
dc.subjectReportingen
dc.subjectSocial Discriminationen
dc.subjectSocial Impacten
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectViolenceen
dc.titleDilemmas in Mandatory Reporting of Domestic Violence: Carative Ethics in Emergency Roomsen
dc.provenanceDigital citation created by the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University for the BIOETHICSLINE database, part of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics' Bioethics Information Retrieval Project funded by the United States National Library of Medicine.en
dc.provenanceDigital citation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named NBIO hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection BioethicsLine hosted by Georgetown University.en


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