Show simple item record

Files in this item

Restricted Access
dc.contributor.advisorCha, Victor Den
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-01T15:52:16Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-01T15:52:16Zen
dc.date.created2014en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2014en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_760804.tar;APT-ETAG: c9be5ef6834e488a25f09d8bbf724785en
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.en
dc.description.abstractThis paper addresses the puzzle of why states proliferate nuclear weapons, despite a widespread call for global nuclear disarmament and the high costs of non-compliance behavior that follow. Most existing research on the determinants of nuclear proliferation has focused solely on either the demand-side or the supply-side of the equation. I, however, approach the puzzle by simultaneously using both the supply and demand aspect of nuclear proliferation, using existing concepts. I hypothesize that states pursue nuclear weapons when they perceive high levels of security threats, and if the following two conditions are met: 1) states do not have a credible, unconditional alliance with a nuclear superpower, and 2) states have received significant nuclear assistance. Based on my hypothesis, I construct an analytical framework and test my set of hypotheses, using the variations in North Korea's pursuit of nuclear weapons over-time as a case study. By analyzing North Korea's case, I found that all three variables - level of perceived threat, credible and unconditional alliance with a nuclear superpower, and whether the state has received significant nuclear assistance - are important when studying why states proliferate nuclear weapons. My findings imply three policy options that could successfully prevent other "latent" states from becoming full-fledged nuclear states.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent28 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceAsian Studiesen
dc.subject.lcshInternational relationsen
dc.subject.otherInternational relationsen
dc.titleModeling State Decisions to Pursue Nuclear Weaponsen
dc.typethesisen


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record