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Cover for The Grammar of Ethics in "Paradise Lost"
dc.contributor.advisorShore, Danielen
dc.creatoren
dc.date.accessioned2015-06-01T16:18:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-06-01T16:18:26Zen
dc.date.created2015en
dc.date.issueden
dc.date.submitted01/01/2015en
dc.identifier.otherAPT-BAG: georgetown.edu.10822_760847.tar;APT-ETAG: 0e21400971747356c81559d37858778den
dc.identifier.urien
dc.descriptionM.A.en
dc.description.abstractA current divide exists in Milton criticism between those who view "Paradise Lost" as an indeterminate work composed of irresolvable choices and aporias (contradictions), and those who view the poem as a singular work of moral certainty. I propose that a way beyond the two opposed interpretive positions lies in what I call the poem's "grammar of ethics," a set of generative rules underlying the ethical claims of the poem. The argument that I make for a grammar of ethics relies for its conceptual framework on the early linguistic work of Noam Chomsky, whose theory of generative grammar provides a helpful analogy to understanding the complex way in which "Paradise Lost's" moral and narrative structure works. Just as the innate rules and principles of generative grammar allow humans to create an infinite number of sentences out of limited means, I contend that an innate moral grammar underlies "Paradise Lost's" narrative structure, which allows the reader to generate her own ethical position. In addition to Chomsky's work, I draw on recent scholarship in moral cognition to make the connection between language and morals.en
dc.description.abstractAfter establishing the scope of the grammar of ethics and its grammatical rules, I illustrate how the moral grammar functions in the poem. I specifically look at Milton's treatment of two key concepts in "Paradise Lost," despair and heroism, and provide close readings of both concepts. In doing so, I distinguish between grammatical and ungrammatical responses to the poem while suggesting ways that the reader generates innumerable ethical readings that move beyond the current polarization in Milton Studies.en
dc.formatPDFen
dc.format.extent75 leavesen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherGeorgetown Universityen
dc.sourceGeorgetown University-Graduate School of Arts & Sciencesen
dc.sourceEnglishen
dc.subjectEpic Poetryen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectGenerative Grammaren
dc.subjectJohn Miltonen
dc.subjectParadise Losten
dc.subject.lcshLiteratureen
dc.subject.lcshEthicsen
dc.subject.lcshLinguisticsen
dc.subject.otherLiteratureen
dc.subject.otherEthicsen
dc.subject.otherLinguisticsen
dc.titleThe Grammar of Ethics in "Paradise Lost"en
dc.typethesisen


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