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dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T22:51:48Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T22:51:48Zen
dc.date.created2000-09-15en
dc.date.issued2000-09-15en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSouth Western Reporter, 3d Series, 2000; 38: 1-52en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/938574en
dc.description.abstractCourt Decision: 38 South Western Reporter, 3d Series 1; 2000 September 15 (date of decision). The Supreme Court of Tennessee held that Tennessee abortion laws that regulate the circumstances under which a woman may have an abortion and that impose criminal liability on physicians for failing to adhere to other abortion statutes are unconstitutional. Planned Parenthood of Middle Tennessee filed suit challenging the constitutionality of Tennessee abortion laws. The laws required that second trimester abortions be performed in a hospital, that physicians alone counsel patients about aspects of the procedure, a two-day mandatory waiting period, and certain medical emergency exceptions. The Supreme Court of Tennessee first held that a woman's right to terminate her pregnancy is protected under the right to privacy and is a fundamental right. The court held the Tennessee laws were unconstitutional because they were not narrowly tailored to further a compelling state interest. Specifically, the second trimester hospital requirement was not narrowly tailored to promoted maternal health because there is substantial evidence that abortions can be performed safely outside a hospital through the first 18 weeks. Secondly, the physician-only counseling requirement was not necessary because it is not necessary for a physician to personally impart the required information. The two-day waiting period was not narrowly tailored to further the state's interest in maternal health, and the medical emergency exceptions was not tailored to protect maternal health, the restrictions were merely to protect her life. Because none of the abortion laws furthered a compelling state interest, they did not pass a strict scrutiny standards of review and were therefore held unconstitutional. The court permanently enjoined enforcement of the laws. [KIE]en
dc.formatCourt Decisionen
dc.languageenen
dc.publisherTennessee. Supreme Courten
dc.sourceeweb:222449en
dc.subjectCounselingen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectLawsen
dc.subjectLiabilityen
dc.subjectMaternal Healthen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectPrivacyen
dc.subjectPregnancyen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectState Interesten
dc.subjectStatutesen
dc.subject.classificationLegal Interests of Woman, Father, Fetus or Abortionen
dc.subject.classificationLegal Interests of Health Personnel or Abortionen
dc.subject.classificationAbortion (Bills, Laws, and Cases)en
dc.titlePlanned Parenthood of Middle Tennessee v. Sundquisten
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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