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dc.creatorKahane, Guyen
dc.creatorSavulescu, Julianen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:09:08Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:09:08Zen
dc.date.created2009-02en
dc.date.issued2009-02en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1093/jmp/jhn038en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medicine and Philosophy 2009 February; 34(1): 6-26en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Brain+damage+and+the+moral+significance+of+consciousness&title=Journal+of+Medicine+and+Philosophy+&volume=34&issue=1&date=2009-02&au=Kahane,+Guy;+Savulescu,+Julianen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jmp/jhn038en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/951828en
dc.description.abstractNeuroimaging studies of brain-damaged patients diagnosed as in the vegetative state suggest that the patients might be conscious. This might seem to raise no new ethical questions given that in related disputes both sides agree that evidence for consciousness gives strong reason to preserve life. We question this assumption. We clarify the widely held but obscure principle that consciousness is morally significant. It is hard to apply this principle to difficult cases given that philosophers of mind distinguish between a range of notions of consciousness and that is unclear which of these is assumed by the principle. We suggest that the morally relevant notion is that of phenomenal consciousness and then use our analysis to interpret cases of brain damage. We argue that enjoyment of consciousness might actually give stronger moral reasons not to preserve a patient's life and, indeed, that these might be stronger when patients retain significant cognitive function.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:323456en
dc.subjectBrainen
dc.subjectConsciousnessen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationValue / Quality of Lifeen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.titleBrain Damage and the Moral Significance of Consciousnessen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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