Show simple item record

dc.creatorAase, Margretheen
dc.creatorNordrehaug, J.E.en
dc.creatorMalterud, K.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:10:36Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:10:36Zen
dc.date.created2008-11en
dc.date.issued2008-11en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1136/jme.2007.023275en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Ethics 2008 November; 34(11): 767-771en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle="If+you+cannot+tolerate+that+risk,+you+should+never+become+a+physician":+a+qualitative+study+about+existential+experiences+among+physicians&title=Journal+of+Medical+Ethics+&volume=34&issue=11&date=2008-11&au=Aase,+Margrethe;+Nordrehaug,+J.E.;+Malterud,+K.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2007.023275en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/954390en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Physicians are exposed to matters of existential character at work, but little is known about the personal impact of such issues. METHODS: To explore how physicians experience and cope with existential aspects of their clinical work and how such experiences affect their professional identities, a qualitative study using individual semistructured interviews has analysed accounts of their experiences related to coping with such challenges. Analysis was by systematic text condensation. The purposeful sample comprised 10 physicians (including three women), aged 33-66 years, residents or specialists in cardiology or cardiothoracic surgery, working in a university hospital with 24-hour emergency service and one general practitioner. RESULTS: Participants described a process by which they were able to develop a capacity for coping with the existential challenges at work. After episodes perceived as shocking or horrible earlier in their career, they at present said that they could deal with death and mostly keep it at a distance. Vulnerability was closely linked to professional responsibility and identity, perceived as a burden to be handled. These demands were balanced by an experience of meaning related to their job, connected to making a difference in their patients' lives. Belonging to a community of their fellows was a presupposition for coping with the loneliness and powerlessness related to their vulnerable professional position. CONCLUSIONS: Physicians' vulnerability facing life and death has been underestimated. Belonging to caring communities may assist growth and coping on exposure to existential aspects of clinical work and developing a professional identity.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:320027en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectCaringen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectInterviewsen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectRisken
dc.subjectSurgeryen
dc.subject.classificationAttitudes Toward Deathen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophy of Medicineen
dc.title"If You Cannot Tolerate That Risk, You Should Never Become a Physician": A Qualitative Study About Existential Experiences Among Physiciansen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2017 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885