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dc.creatorGadit, A.A.M.en
dc.creatorMugford, G.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:15:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:15:00Zen
dc.date.created2008-06en
dc.date.issued2008-06en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Ethics 2008 June; 34(6): 463-466en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=A+pilot+study+of+bullying+and+harassment+among+medical+professionals+in+Pakistan,+focusing+on+psychiatry:+need+for+a+medical+ombudsman&title=Journal+of+Medical+Ethics+&volume=34&issue=6&date=2008-06&au=Gadit,+A.A.M.;+Mugford,+G.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/957133en
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: The magnitude of bullying and harassment among psychiatrists is reportedly high, yet no peer-review published studies addressing this issue could be found. Therefore, it was decided to conduct a pilot study to assess the degree of the problem, the types of bullying/harassment and to provide some insights into the situation. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Following multiple focus group meetings, a yes/no response type questionnaire was developed to assess the degree and type of bullying and harassment experienced by psychiatrists. Over a 3-month period the questionnaire was administered to a random sample of 60 psychiatrists. 57 out of the 60 psychiatrists reported harassment and bullying. Frequencies of the following response variables are presented in descending order: rumours 40% (n = 24); defamation 20% (n = 12); passing remarks 20% (n = 12); false accusations 15% (n = 9); threats 13.3% (n = 8); verbal abuse 13.3% (n = 8); unjustified complaints 13.3% (n = 8); promotion blocked 13.3% (n = 8); humiliation 13% (n = 8); bad reference given 10% (n = 6); credentials questioned 8.3% (n = 5); physical attacks 5% (n = 3); termination 5% (n = 3); derogatory remarks 1.7% (n = 1) and 1.7% (n = 1) were subjected to personal work. As a result of being subjected to harassment, 66.7% of the psychiatrists did not take any action, whereas 33.3% confronted the person(s) they believed responsible. Asked whether the bullying and harassment caused distress, 18.3% of the psychiatrists did not report any effect, 30% reported mild distress, 40% moderate distress and severe distress was reported by 11.7%. CONCLUSIONS: It was concluded that the magnitude of bullying and harassment among psychiatrists may be quite high, as evidenced by this pilot study. There is a need for extensive systematic studies on this subject and to establish strategies to prevent and address this issue at a national and regulatory level.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:316688en
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPsychiatryen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subject.classificationProfessional-Professional Relationshipen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.titleA Pilot Study of Bullying and Harassment Among Medical Professionals in Pakistan, Focusing on Psychiatry: Need for a Medical Ombudsmanen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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