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dc.creatorBryon, E.en
dc.creatorDierckx de Casterlé, B.en
dc.creatorGastmans, C.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:15:00Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:15:00Zen
dc.date.created2008-06en
dc.date.issued2008-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1136/jme.2007.021493en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Medical Ethics 2008 June; 34(6): 431-436en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/957139en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Nurses?+attitudes+towards+artificial+food+or+fluid+administration+in+patients+with+dementia+and+in+terminally+ill+patients:+a+review+of+the+literature&title=Journal+of+Medical+Ethics+&volume=34&issue=6&date=2008-06&au=Bryon,+E.;+Dierckx+de+Casterlé,+B.;+Gastmans,+C.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jme.2007.021493en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: Although nurses have an important role in the care process surrounding artificial food or fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients, little is known about their attitudes towards this issue. The purpose of this study was to thoroughly examine nurses' attitudes by means of a literature review. METHOD: An extensive systematic search of the electronic databases PubMed, Cinahl, PsycINFO, The Cochrane Library, FRANCIS, Philosopher's Index and Social Sciences Citation Index was conducted to identify pertinent articles published from January 1990 to January 2007. FINDINGS: Nurses' arguments for or against could be categorised as ethical-legal, clinical or social-professional. The most important arguments explicitly for artificial food and fluid administration in patients with dementia or in terminally ill patients were sanctity of life, considering artificial food and fluid administration as basic nursing care, and giving reliable nutrition, hydration or medication. An explicit counter-argument was the high cost of treatment. Arguments used by opponents and proponents were quality of life and dignified death. The arguments were not strikingly different for the two patient populations. It turned out that the nurses' ethical arguments remarkably reflected the current ethical debate. But some of their clinical presuppositions contradicted current clinical evidence. CONCLUSION: The interaction between clinical facts and ethical reflections makes the findings of this review extremely relevant for clinical ethics. A large need exists to clearly communicate to nurses the latest clinical evidence and the main results of ongoing ethical debates.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:316681en
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectClinical Ethicsen
dc.subjectDatabasesen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFooden
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectLiteratureen
dc.subjectNursesen
dc.subjectNutritionen
dc.subjectNursing Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subjectSanctity of Lifeen
dc.subjectTerminally Illen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Personnel Attitudes Toward Deathen
dc.subject.classificationCare of the Dying Patienten
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care Programs for the Ageden
dc.titleNurses? Attitudes Towards Artificial Food or Fluid Administration in Patients With Dementia and in Terminally Ill Patients: A Review of the Literatureen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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