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dc.creatorSchluter, Jessicaen
dc.creatorWinch, Sarahen
dc.creatorHolzhauser, Kerrien
dc.creatorHenderson, Amandaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:15:14Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:15:14Zen
dc.date.created2008-05en
dc.date.issued2008-05en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1177/0969733007088357en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursing Ethics 2008 May; 15(3): 304-321en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Nurses?+moral+sensitivity+and+hospital+ethical+climate:+a+literature+review&title=Nursing+Ethics+&volume=15&issue=3&date=2008-05&au=Schluter,+Jessica;+Winch,+Sarah;+Holzhauser,+Kerri;+Henderson,+Amandaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0969733007088357en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/957549en
dc.description.abstractIncreased technological and pharmacological interventions in patient care when patient outcomes are uncertain have been linked to the escalation in moral and ethical dilemmas experienced by health care providers in acute care settings. Health care research has shown that facilities that are able to attract and retain nursing staff in a competitive environment and provide high quality care have the capacity for nurses to process and resolve moral and ethical dilemmas. This article reports on the findings of a systematic review of the empirical literature (1980 - February 2007) on the effects of unresolved moral distress and poor ethical climate on nurse turnover. Articles were sought to answer the review question: Does unresolved moral distress and a poor organizational ethical climate increase nurse turnover? Nine articles met the criteria of the review process. Although the prevailing sentiment was that poor ethical climate and moral distress caused staff turnover, definitive answers to the review question remain elusive because there are limited data that confidently support this statement.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:316137en
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectLiteratureen
dc.subjectNursesen
dc.subjectPatient Careen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Careen
dc.subject.classificationBusiness Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophy of Nursingen
dc.titleNurses? Moral Sensitivity and Hospital Ethical Climate: A Literature Reviewen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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