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dc.creatorMertz, Marcelen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:20:23Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:20:23Zen
dc.date.created2007-09en
dc.date.issued2007-09en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1007/s11019-007-9050-xen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMedicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2007 September; 10(3): 329-345en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Complementary+and+alternative+medicine:+the+challenges+of+ethical+justification&title=Medicine,+Health+Care+and+Philosophy+&volume=10&issue=3&date=2007-09&au=Mertz,+Marcelen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11019-007-9050-xen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/962894en
dc.description.abstractWith the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) increasing in western societies, questions of the ethical justification of these alternative health care approaches and practices have to be addressed. In order to evaluate philosophical reasoning on this subject, it is of paramount importance to identify and analyse possible arguments for the ethical justification of CAM considering contemporary biomedical ethics as well as more fundamental philosophical aspects. Moreover, it is vital to provide adequate analytical instruments for this task, such as separating, CAM as belief system' and ,CAM as practice'. Findings show that beneficence and non-maleficence are central issues for an ethical justification of CAM as practice, while freedom of thought and religion are central to CAM as belief system. Many justification strategies have limitations and qualifications that have to be taken into account. Singularly descriptive premises in an argument often prove to be more problematic than universal ethical principles. Thus, non-ethical issues related to a general philosophical underpinning - e.g. epistemology, semantics, and ontology - are highly relevant for determining a justification strategy, especially when strong metaphysical assumptions are involved. Even if some values are shared with traditional biomedicine, axiological differences have to be considered as well. Further research should be done about specific CAM positions. These could be combined with applied qualitative social research methods.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:309068en
dc.subjectBeneficenceen
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectFreedomen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPrevalenceen
dc.subjectReligionen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectSocial Researchen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophy of the Health Professionsen
dc.titleComplementary and Alternative Medicine: The Challenges of Ethical Justificationen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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