Show simple item record

dc.creatorBuchanan, David Rossen
dc.creatorMiller, Franklin Gen
dc.creatorWallerstein, Ninaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:20:56Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:20:56Zen
dc.date.created2007-06en
dc.date.issued2007-06en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1353/cpr.2007.0006en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationProgress in community health partnerships : research, education, and action 2007 Summer; 1(2): 153-60en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Ethical+issues+in+community-based+participatory+research:+balancing+rigorous+research+with+community+participation+in+community+intervention+studies.&title=Progress+in+community+health+partnerships+:+research,+education,+and+action+&volume=1&issue=2&date=2007-06&au=Buchanan,+David+Ross;+Miller,+Franklin+G;+Wallerstein,+Ninaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1353/cpr.2007.0006en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/963963en
dc.description.abstractPROBLEM: Concerns have been raised that community participation might compromise scientific rigor in community-based participatory research (CBPR). PURPOSE: The purpose of this paper is to identify potential sources of tension between the values of scientific rigor and community participation in CBPR. KEY POINTS: CBPR lies at the nexus of two major underlying ethical concerns--respect for community autonomy and the fair allocation of limited public resources--which have generated considerable controversy about appropriate criteria for evaluating CBPR grant proposals. The complexity of evaluating CBPR proposals is compounded by the multiple purposes that it serves: (1) an ethical function of demonstrating respect for community autonomy; (2) a research method for eliciting ideas for interventions to improve population health; and (3) an intervention in itself, seeking to enhance the capacities of community participants. CONCLUSIONS: Growing use of CBPR raises two new ethical issues that deserve greater public attention: first, the problem of securing informed consent and demonstrating respect for community autonomy when the locus of research shifts from the individual to community level; and second, fair distribution of scarce public resources when practical constraints make the most rigorous research designs for assessing the effects of community interventions virtually impossible. In light of recent federal initiatives, it is critical to achieve a common understanding of appropriate ethical and scientific standards for assessing the merits of CBPR.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:307658en
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectCommunity Participationen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectInformed Consenten
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectStandardsen
dc.subjectValuesen
dc.subject.classificationHuman Experimentation Policy Guidelines / Institutional Review Boardsen
dc.subject.classificationInformed Consent or Human Experimentationen
dc.subject.classificationSocial Control of Human Experimentationen
dc.titleEthical Issues in Community-Based Participatory Research: Balancing Rigorous Research With Community Participation in Community Intervention Studiesen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2018 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885