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dc.creatorLynn, Joanneen
dc.creatorBaily, Mary Annen
dc.creatorBottrell, Melissaen
dc.creatorJennings, Bruceen
dc.creatorLevine, Robert J.en
dc.creatorDavidoff, Franken
dc.creatorCasarett, Daviden
dc.creatorCorrigan, Janeten
dc.creatorFox, Ellenen
dc.creatorWynia, Matthew K.en
dc.creatorAgich, George J.en
dc.creatorO'Kane, Margareten
dc.creatorSperoff, Theodoreen
dc.creatorSchyve, Paulen
dc.creatorBatalden, Paulen
dc.creatorTunis, Seanen
dc.creatorBerlinger, Nancyen
dc.creatorCronenwett, Lindaen
dc.creatorFitzmaurice, J. Michaelen
dc.creatorNeveloff Dubler, Nancyen
dc.creatorJames, Brenten
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:21:15Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:21:15Zen
dc.date.created2007-05-01en
dc.date.issued2007-05-01en
dc.identifierdoi:10.7326/0003-4819-146-9-200705010-00155en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAnnals of Internal Medicine 2007 May 1; 146(9): 666-673en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=The+ethics+of+using+quality+improvement+methods+in+health+care&title=Annals+of+Internal+Medicine+&volume=146&issue=9&date=2007-05&au=Lynn,+Joanne;+Baily,+Mary+Ann;+Bottrell,+Melissa;+Jennings,+Bruce;+Levine,+Robert+J.;+Davidoff,+Frank;+Casarett,+David;+Corrigan,+Janet;+Fox,+Ellen;+Wynia,+Matthew+K.;+Agich,+George+J.;+O'Kane,+Margaret;+Speroff,+Theodore;+Schyve,+Paul;+Batalden,+Paul;+Tunis,+Sean;+Berlinger,+Nancy;+Cronenwett,+Linda;+Fitzmaurice,+J.+Michael;+Neveloff+Dubler,+Nancy;+James,+Brenten
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.7326/0003-4819-146-9-200705010-00155en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/964572en
dc.description.abstractQuality improvement (QI) activities can improve health care but must be conducted ethically. The Hastings Center convened leaders and scholars to address ethical requirements for QI and their relationship to regulations protecting human subjects of research. The group defined QI as systematic, data-guided activities designed to bring about immediate improvements in health care delivery in particular settings and concluded that QI is an intrinsic part of normal health care operations. Both clinicians and patients have an ethical responsibility to participate in QI, provided that it complies with specified ethical requirements. Most QI activities are not human subjects research and should not undergo review by an institutional review board; rather, appropriately calibrated supervision of QI activities should be part of professional supervision of clinical practice. The group formulated a framework that would use key characteristics of a project and its context to categorize it as QI, human subjects research, or both, with the potential of a customized institutional review board process for the overlap category. The group recommended a period of innovation and evaluation to refine the framework for ethical conduct of QI and to integrate that framework into clinical practice.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:306904en
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectEvaluationen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectHealth Care Deliveryen
dc.subjectMethodsen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectReviewen
dc.subject.classificationQuality of Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationSocial Control of Human Experimentationen
dc.titleThe Ethics of Using Quality Improvement Methods in Health Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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