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dc.creatorDavies, J. Clarenceen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:21:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:21:22Zen
dc.date.created2007-05en
dc.date.issued2007-05en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationWashington, DC: Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 2007 May: 73 p.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://timetravel.mementoweb.org/memento/2007/http://www.nanotechproject.org/process/assets/files/2698/197_nanoepa_pen9.pdfen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/964772en
dc.description.abstract"This paper focuses on the U.s. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and its role in dealing with the potential adverse effects of nano. EPA administers more laws that are relevant to nano than does any other agency. The federal law the potentially could have the broadest coverage of nanomaterials is the Toxic Substances Control Act, administered by the EPA. EPA is doing more research on nano than is any other regulatory agency. It will inevitably be a central player in the unfolding drama of nano's development." (page 11 of the report)en
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:306628en
dc.subjectAdverse Effectsen
dc.subjectLawen
dc.subjectLawsen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subject.classificationNanotechnologyen
dc.subject.classificationEnvironmental Qualityen
dc.subject.classificationGovernment Ethicsen
dc.titleEPA and Nanotechnology: Oversight for the 21st Centuryen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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