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dc.creatorGoldsteen, Minkeen
dc.creatorAbma, Tinekeen
dc.creatorOeseburg, Barthen
dc.creatorVerkerk, Marianen
dc.creatorVerhey, Fransen
dc.creatorWiddershoven, Guyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:22:22Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:22:22Zen
dc.date.created2007-01en
dc.date.issued2007-01en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1111/biot.2007.21.issue-1en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBioethics 2007 January; 21(1): 1-12en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=What+is+it+to+be+a+daughter?+Identities+under+pressure+in+dementia+care&title=Bioethics+&volume=21&issue=1&date=2007-01&au=Goldsteen,+Minke;+Abma,+Tineke;+Oeseburg,+Barth;+Verkerk,+Marian;+Verhey,+Frans;+Widdershoven,+Guyen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/biot.2007.21.issue-1en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/966714en
dc.description.abstractThis article concentrates on the care for people who suffer from progressive dementia. Dementia has a great impact on a person's well-being as well as on his or her social environment. Dealing with dementia raises moral issues and challenges for participants, especially for family members. One of the moral issues in the care for people with dementia is centred on responsibilities; how do people conceive and determine their responsibilities towards one another? To investigate this issue we use the theoretical perspective of Margaret Walker. She states that ideas about identity play a crucial role in patterns of normative expectations with regard to the distribution of responsibilities in daily practices of care. The results of this study show how the identity of a family-member is put under pressure and changes during her loved one's illness that leads to difficulties and misunderstandings concerning the issue of responsibility These results offer an insight into the complexities of actual practices of responsibility and highlight the importance for those caring for people with dementia of attending carefully to how they see themselves and how they see other people involved (Who am I? Who do I want to be for the other?). Answers to such questions show what people expect from themselves and from one another, and how they at any rate, are distributing responsibilities in a given situation. Professional caregivers should take into account that family members might have different ideas about who they are and consequently about what their responsibilities are.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:304170en
dc.subjectCaregiversen
dc.subjectCaringen
dc.subjectDementiaen
dc.subjectEnvironmenten
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectResponsibilitiesen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationSociology of Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationPatient Relationshipsen
dc.subject.classificationNeurosciences and Mental Health Therapiesen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care Programs for the Ageden
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Mentally Disabled Personsen
dc.titleWhat Is It to Be a Daughter? Identities Under Pressure in Dementia Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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