Show simple item record

dc.creatorArmstrong, Elizabeth M.en
dc.creatorCarpenter, Daniel P.en
dc.creatorHojnacki, Marieen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:28:54Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:28:54Zen
dc.date.created2006-08en
dc.date.issued2006-08en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1215/03616878-2006-002en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Health Politics, Policy and Law 2006 August; 31(4): 729-772en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Whose+deaths+matter?+Mortality,+advocacy,+and+attention+to+disease+in+the+mass+media&title=Journal+of+Health+Politics,+Policy+and+Law+&volume=31&issue=4&date=2006-08&au=Armstrong,+Elizabeth+M.;+Carpenter,+Daniel+P.;+Hojnacki,+Marieen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1215/03616878-2006-002en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/971183en
dc.description.abstractDiseases capture public attention in varied ways and to varying degrees. In this essay, we use a unique data set that we have collected about print and broadcast media attention to seven diseases across nineteen years in order to address two questions. First, how (if at all) is mortality related to attention? Second, how (if at all) is advocacy, in the form of organized interest group activity, related to media attention? Our analysis of the cross-disease and cross-temporal variation in media attention suggests that who suffers from a disease as well as how many suffer are critical factors in explaining why some diseases get more attention than others. In particular, our data reveal that both the print and the broadcast media tend to be much less attentive to diseases that disproportionately burden blacks relative to whites. We also find a positive link between the size of organizational communities that take an interest in disease and media attention, though this finding depends on the characteristics of those communities. Finally, this study also reveals the limitations of relying on single-disease case studies-and particularly HIV/AIDS-to understand how and why disease captures public attention. Many previous inferences about media attention that have been drawn from the case of AIDS are not reflective of the attention allocated to other diseases.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:298246en
dc.subjectAidsen
dc.subjectCase Studiesen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectMass Mediaen
dc.subjectMortalityen
dc.subject.classificationSociology of Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationInternational and Political Dimensions of Biology and Medicineen
dc.subject.classificationJournalism / Mass Media Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Particular Diseases or Groupsen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Care for Minoritiesen
dc.titleWhose Deaths Matter? Mortality, Advocacy, and Attention to Disease in the Mass Mediaen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record


Georgetown University Seal
©2009—2022 Bioethics Research Library
Box 571212 Washington DC 20057-1212
202.687.3885