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dc.creatorKim, Su Hyunen
dc.creatorKjervik, Dianeen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:41:01Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:41:01Zen
dc.date.created2005-09en
dc.date.issued2005-09en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1191/0969733005ne817oaen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursing Ethics 2005 September; 12(5): 493-506en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Deferred+decision+making:+patients'+reliance+on+family+and+physicians+for+CPR+decisions+in+critical+care&title=Nursing+Ethics+&volume=12&issue=5&date=2005-09&au=Kim,+Su+Hyun;+Kjervik,+Dianeen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1191/0969733005ne817oaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/979605en
dc.description.abstractThe aim of this study was to investigate factors associated with seriously ill patients' preferences for their family and physicians making resuscitation decisions on their behalf. Using SUPPORT II data, the study revealed that, among 362 seriously ill patients who were experiencing pain, 277 (77%) answered that they would want their family and physicians to make resuscitation decisions for them instead of their own wishes being followed if they were to lose decision-making capacity. Even after controlling for other variables, patients who preferred the option of undergoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in the future were twice as likely, and those who had had ventilator treatment were four-fifths less likely, to rely on their family and physicians than those who did not want CPR (odds ratio (OR) = 2.28; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-4.38) or those who had not received ventilator treatment (OR = 0.23; 95% CI 0.06-0.90). Psychological variables (anxiety, quality of life, and depression), symptomatic variables (severity of pain and activities of daily living) and the existence of surrogates were not significantly associated with patients' preferences for having their family and physicians make resuscitation decisions for them. Age was not a significant factor for predicting the decision-making role after controlling for other variables.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:287339en
dc.subjectDecision Makingen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subjectPhysiciansen
dc.subjectQuality of Lifeen
dc.subjectResuscitationen
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.subject.classificationThird Party Consenten
dc.titleDeferred Decision Making: Patients' Reliance on Family and Physicians for CPR Decisions in Critical Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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