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dc.creatorMay, Thomasen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:41:41Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:41:41Zen
dc.date.created2005-07en
dc.date.issued2005-07en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1080/15265160590953076en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAmerican Journal of Bioethics 2005 July-August; 5(4): 34-44en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Funding+agendas:+has+bioterror+defense+been+over-prioritized?&title=American+Journal+of+Bioethics+&volume=5&issue=4&date=2005-07&au=May,+Thomasen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15265160590953076en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/980601en
dc.description.abstractPost-9/11, concern about bioterrorism has transformed public health from unappreciated to a central component of national security. Within the War on Terror, bioterrorism preparedness has taken a back seat only to direct military action in terms of funding. Domestically, homelessness, joblessness, crime, education, and race relations are just a few of a litany of pressing issues requiring government attention. Even within the biomedical sciences and healthcare, issues surrounding the fact that more than 40 million Americans lack health insurance, the rising cost of prescription medications, and the use of government funds for research using embryonic stem cells remain unresolved. Should we prioritize a hypothetical threat (bioterrorism), or existing conditions that have implications for identifiable individuals? Even more fundamentally, should we prioritize research aimed at defense from bioterrorism (or even terrorism in general) when there are so many pressing social problems that affect the U.S. population?en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:286115en
dc.subjectBioterrorismen
dc.subjectCellsen
dc.subjectCrimeen
dc.subjectEducationen
dc.subjectEmbryonic Stem Cellsen
dc.subjectGovernmenten
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Insuranceen
dc.subjectInsuranceen
dc.subjectPublic Healthen
dc.subjectResearchen
dc.subjectSocial Problemsen
dc.subjectStem Cellsen
dc.subjectTerrorismen
dc.subjectWaren
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Careen
dc.subject.classificationBiological and Chemical Weaponsen
dc.subject.classificationScientific Research Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationEconomics of Health Careen
dc.titleFunding Agendas: Has Bioterror Defense Been Over-Prioritized?en
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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