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dc.creatorStewart, Douglas O.en
dc.creatorDeMarco, Joseph P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T23:47:25Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-08T23:47:25Zen
dc.date.created2005en
dc.date.issued2005en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1007/BF02448596en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJournal of Bioethical Inquiry 2005; 2(3): 153-164en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=An+economic+theory+of+patient+decision-making&title=Journal+of+Bioethical+Inquiry+&volume=2&issue=3&spage=153-164&date=2005&au=Stewart,+Douglas+O.;+DeMarco,+Joseph+P.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02448596en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/985764en
dc.description.abstractPatient autonomy, as exercised in the informed consent process, is a central concern in bioethics. The typical bioethicist's analysis of autonomy centers on decisional capacity--finding the line between autonomy and its absence. This approach leaves unexplored the structure of reasoning behind patient treatment decisions. To counter that approach, we present a microeconomic theory of patient decision-making regarding the acceptable level of medical treatment from the patient's perspective. We show that a rational patient's desired treatment level typically departs from the level yielding an absence of symptoms, the level we call ideal. This microeconomic theory demonstrates why patients have good reason not to pursue treatment to the point of absence of physical symptoms. We defend our view against possible objections that it is unrealistic and that it fails to adequately consider harm a patient may suffer by curtailing treatment. Our analysis is fruitful in various ways. It shows why decisions often considered unreasonable might be fully reasonable. It offers a theoretical account of how physician misinformation may adversely affect a patient's decision. It shows how billing costs influence patient decision-making. It indicates that health care professionals' beliefs about the 'unreasonable' attitudes of patients might often be wrong. It provides a better understanding of patient rationality that should help to ensure fuller information as well as increased respect for patient decision-making.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:279133en
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectAutonomyen
dc.subjectBioethicsen
dc.subjectConsenten
dc.subjectHarmen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectHealth Careen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subject.classificationPatient Relationshipsen
dc.subject.classificationInformed Consenten
dc.subject.classificationEconomics of Health Careen
dc.titleAn Economic Theory of Patient Decision-Makingen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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