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dc.creatorLittle, Paulen
dc.creatorDorward, Martinaen
dc.creatorWarner, Gregen
dc.creatorMoore, Michaelen
dc.creatorStephens, Katharineen
dc.creatorSenior, Janeen
dc.creatorKendrick, Tonyen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:03:54Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:03:54Zen
dc.date.created2004-02-21en
dc.date.issued2004-02-21en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1136/bmj.37999.716157.44en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBMJ: British Medical Journal 2004 February 21; 328(7437): 441- 444en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Randomised+controlled+trial+of+effect+of+leaflets+to+empower+patients+in+consultations+in+primary+care&title=BMJ:+British+Medical+Journal+&volume=328&issue=7437&spage=444&date=2004-02&au=Little,+Paul;+Dorward,+Martina;+Warner,+Greg;+Moore,+Michael;+Stephens,+Katharine;+Senior,+Jane;+Kendrick,+Tonyen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.37999.716157.44en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/992648en
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of leaflets encouraging patients to raise concerns and to discuss symptoms or other health related issues in the consultation. DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Five general practices in three settings in the United Kingdom. PARTICIPANTS: 636 consecutive patients, aged 16-80 years, randomised to receive a general leaflet, a depression leaflet, both, or neither. MAIN OUTCOMES: Mean item score on the medical interview satisfaction scale, consultation time, prescribing, referral, and investigation. RESULTS: The general leaflet increased patient satisfaction and was more effective with shorter consultations (leaflet 0.64, 95% confidence interval 0.19 to 1.08; time 0.31, 0.0 to 0.06; interaction between both -0.045, - 0.08 to-0.009), with similar results for subscales related to the different aspects of communication. Thus for a 10 minute consultation the leaflet increased satisfaction by 7% (seven centile points) and for a five minute consultation by 14%. The leaflet overall caused a small non-significant increase in consultation time (0.36 minutes, -0.54 to 1.26). Although there was no change in prescribing or referral, a general leaflet increased the numbers of investigations (odds ratio 1.43, 1.00 to 2.05), which persisted when controlling for the major potential confounders of perceived medical need and patient preference (1.87, 1.10 to 3.19). Most of excess investigations were not thought strongly needed by the doctor or the patient. The depression leaflet had no significant effect on any outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Encouraging patients to raise issues and to discuss symptoms and other health related issues in the consultation improves their satisfaction and perceptions of communication, particularly in short consultations. Doctors do, however, need to elicit expectations to prevent needless investigations.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:270306en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectConsultationen
dc.subjectDoctorsen
dc.subjectHealthen
dc.subjectPatient Satisfactionen
dc.subjectPatientsen
dc.subject.classificationPatient Relationshipsen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Careen
dc.titleRandomised Controlled Trial of Effect of Leaflets to Empower Patients in Consultations in Primary Careen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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