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dc.creatorBarilan, Y. Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:05:46Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:05:46Zen
dc.date.created2004en
dc.date.issued2004en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1023/B:MHEP.0000034322.60058.01en
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMedicine, Health Care and Philosophy: A European Journal 2004; 7(2): 163-173en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Towards+a+dialogue+between+utilitarianism+and+medicine&title=Medicine,+Health+Care+and+Philosophy:+A+European+Journal+&volume=7&issue=2&spage=163-173&date=2004&au=Barilan,+Y.+Michaelen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1023/B:MHEP.0000034322.60058.01en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/995713en
dc.description.abstractUtilitarianism focuses on the optimization of personal well being in ways that seems to make the practice of medicine irrelevant to the well being of the practitioners, unless given external incentives such as money or honor. Care based on indirect incentives is considered inferior to care motivated internally. This leads to the paradox of utilitarian care. Following Nozick's conceptual Pleasure Machine it is argued that in addition to the promotion of personal well being, people care about fulfilling their well being in a world which is real, just, good, and beautiful. Complete mechanization of social and personal life in accordance with a strict utilitarian regime is also incompatible with the kind of world people desire, even if it promises more fulfillments in terms of personal well being. This explains the so- called Taurek-Parfit paradox, according to which sometimes ethics seems "to count the numbers" and sometimes not. The very pursuit of utilitarianism does not contribute to any personal life plan. The helping professions make the world a better place for us to live in, even though they do not necessarily bear directly on the well being of any individual other than the recipients of care. This resolves the paradox of utilitarian care.en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:266072en
dc.subjectEthicsen
dc.subjectIncentivesen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectMedicineen
dc.subjectUtilitarianismen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophical Ethicsen
dc.subject.classificationBioethicsen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Careen
dc.subject.classificationPhilosophy of Medicineen
dc.titleTowards a Dialogue Between Utilitarianism and Medicineen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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