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dc.creatorKim, Shinmien
dc.creatorLee, Yunjungen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-09T00:08:03Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-09T00:08:03Zen
dc.date.created2003-11en
dc.date.issued2003-11en
dc.identifierdoi:10.1191/0969733003ne652oaen
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationNursing Ethics 2003 November; 10(6): 624-637en
dc.identifier.urihttp://worldcatlibraries.org/registry/gateway?version=1.0&url_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:journal&atitle=Korean+nurses'+attitudes+to+good+and+bad+death,+life-+sustaining+treatment+and+advance+directives&title=Nursing+Ethics+&volume=10&issue=6&spage=624-637&date=2003-11&au=Kim,+Shinmi;+Lee,+Yunjungen
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1191/0969733003ne652oaen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10822/997121en
dc.description.abstractThis study was an investigation of which distinctive elements would best describe good and bad death, preferences for life- sustaining treatment, and advance directives. The following elements of a good death were identified by surveying 185 acute- care hospital nurses: comfort, not being a burden to the family, a good relationship with family members, a readiness to die, and a belief in perpetuity. Comfort was regarded as the most important. Distinctive elements of a bad death were: persistent vegetative state, sudden death, pain and agony, dying alone, and being a burden to the family. Of the 185 respondents, 90.8% answered that they did not intend to receive life-sustaining treatment if they suffered from a terminal illness without any chance of recovery; 77.8% revealed positive attitudes toward advance directives. Sixty- seven per cent of the respondents stated that they were willing to discuss their own death and dying; the perception of such discussions differed according to the medical condition (p = 0.001). The elements of a bad death differed significantly depending on the disease state (p = 0.003) and on economic status (p = 0.023).en
dc.formatArticleen
dc.languageenen
dc.sourceeweb:264246en
dc.subjectAdvance Directivesen
dc.subjectAttitudesen
dc.subjectDeathen
dc.subjectDiseaseen
dc.subjectFamily Membersen
dc.subjectIllnessen
dc.subjectLifeen
dc.subjectNursesen
dc.subjectPainen
dc.subjectPersistent Vegetative Stateen
dc.subject.classificationSociology of Health Careen
dc.subject.classificationHealth Personnel Attitudes Toward Deathen
dc.subject.classificationProlongation of Life and Euthanasiaen
dc.subject.classificationLiving Wills / Advance Directivesen
dc.titleKorean Nurses' Attitudes to Good and Bad Death, Life- Sustaining Treatment and Advance Directivesen
dc.provenanceCitation prepared by the Library and Information Services group of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics, Georgetown University for the ETHXWeb database.en
dc.provenanceCitation migrated from OpenText LiveLink Discovery Server database named EWEB hosted by the Bioethics Research Library to the DSpace collection EthxWeb hosted by DigitalGeorgetown.en


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